Could This Inflatable Balloon Pill Help You Lose Weight?

| Weight Loss Posted: Thursday, February dr oz garcinia cambogia 20, 2014, 12:00 PM THURSDAY, Feb. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) — A small amount of weight loss might help combat sleep apnea, a new study suggests. Finnish researchers said losing as little as 5 percent of body weight seems to lead to significant improvement in the condition — in which breathing pauses frequently while people are asleep, resulting in disrupted sleep and daytime fatigue. “Being overweight is considered the most important risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea,” said lead researcher Dr.
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Problems Beyond the Pill More than that, people shouldn’t expect the pill to solve all their troubles with food. Apovian noted that even with gastric bypass surgery, people tend to start gaining weight back after http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/01/13/idUSnHUGdsQR+73+ONE20140113 two years. Even more so, either method will limit the amount of food you’re able to eat, so in order to be healthy, people will need to switch their diets to consume high-quality, nutrient dense food to get all the vitamins and minerals they need on a reduced intake, Bessesen said. In order for the method to be effective for weight loss, people will have to combine the pill therapies with healthier meals, and will have to maintain the change after they stop treatment for the weight loss to be maintained. Ultimately, neither pill solves the perpetual downfall with dieting – people’s inability to do it long-term.
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Lose Weight, Lose Sleep Apnea?

Luckily, the very same treatment for sleep apnea may also ease depression, according to Cleveland Clinic research. Sleep Apnea May Be A Risk Factor For Diabetes There is a growing body of research supporting a link between the presence of sleep apnea and metabolic disorders like diabetes, HuffPost reported in May. Both moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea were found to be predictors of the disease. A previous study found that people with sleep apnea had more than double the risk of developing diabetes.
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